The Week In Ethics Blog

What We Can Learn About Optimism & Leadership from Simon Sinek

What We Can Learn About Optimism & Leadership from Simon Sinek

Posted On: Tuesday, December 13, 2016

“A good leader doesn’t only inspire us to have confidence in what they can do. A great leader inspires us to have confidence in what we can do.”  Together is Better: A Little Book of Inspiration (Simon Sinek, 2016)

The adage “what we focus on, we get more of” is as true in leadership as anything. And, conversely,  when we don’t focus on the right things, crises inevitably occur.

Leadership expert Simon Sinek refers to himself as an optimist. He studies and writes about what makes great leaders. He talks about vision, purpose, service and the “why” behind leadership: perhaps best known for his 2009

TED Talk “How Great Leaders Inspire Action” (which has had over 29 million views so far).

The cautionary tales of leadership gone wrong, like Wells Fargo’s current ethics crisis, are very troubling but don’t necessarily inspire us to be better leaders. Perhaps because we don’t see ourselves making the same choices. (And yet, too often those choices are made.) Sinek, in his new book, Together is Better, offers a fable of how optimism is possible — for leaders who want to make their leadership count as well as anyone seeking more meaning in their professional and personal lives.

The story line is simple and mirrors workplace challenges. The one or two sentence observations on life and leadership often fit the number of characters in a Twitter tweet. For example, “A team is not a group of people who work together. A team is a group of people who trust each other.” This wisdom may be dismissed as obvious. However, not so obvious to the number of leaders who talk about their people as a team (as former Wells Fargo Chairman and CEO John Stumpf did in his testimony before The U.S. Senate Banking Committee) when their team doesn’t trust each other or the company. Also consider how often leaders don’t realize trust is absent because they aren’t focused on ensuring trust is earned and present.

The leadership fable has nearly 50 Sinek observations that invite deeper consideration. He’s integrated and distilled themes from his work — including finding a vision, innovation, passion versus stress, success and what inspires — and put them into a tale that demonstrates how to take a leadership journey together rather than alone.

The vision, he explains in the preface, that drives him (and the fable) is that people working together “… build a world in which the vast majority of us wake up every single morning inspired to go to work, feel safe when we’re there and return home fulfilled at the end of the day.”

“What good is having a belly if there is no fire in it?” Sinek asks. “Wake up, drink your passion, light a match and get to work!”

The end of the year, and the beginning of the next, offer another window for self-reflection. An opportunity to turn the focus to our own leadership and consider what we stand for and what we are doing about it. Sinek’s fable and observations invite a focus on what enables our leadership to be more open to inspiration from those around us, as well as being more inspiring to others. It’s a catalyst for optimism.

Gael O'Brien

Gael O’Brien is a catalyst for leaders leading with purpose and impact through clarity, presence and connection so that they create engagement that transforms their companies’ future. She is an executive coach, culture coach, speech coach and presenter. She publishes The Week in Ethics and is a Business Ethics Magazine columnist, a Kallman Executive Fellow, Hoffman Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University and a Senior Fellow Social Innovation, the Lewis Institute at Babson College.

1
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
0 Comment authors
The Week in Ethics: How Owning Purpose Tames the Unexpected | Gael O’Brien The Week in Ethics: Columns on Ethics, Leadership and Life Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
trackback

[…] « The Week in Ethics: What We Can Learn About Optimism & Leadership from Simon Sinek […]

Posts by Category

Archive

Most Recent

Making Ethics Real Makes Leadership Real

What is the key to effective leadership? The answer is ethics. However, if this doesn’t seem an easy sell…stay with it. Making ethics real makes leadership real. We’ll look at four ways to bring this home. First, some context. Ethical Failures When ethics isn’t a key driver in an organization, the fallout from ethical lapses […]

read on »
Gillette’s Leadership, the Backlash and Possibility

Gillette released this week a short film “We Believe: The Best Men Can Be.” Some criticize it as an attack on men; others disagree and see it as inspiring and hopeful. My take is the under two-minute video illustrates another Fortune 500 company’s courage and leadership to try and use the power of its brand […]

read on »
2018 Leadership Lessons

It isn’t just leaders’ abilities and experience that give them confidence. Authentic confidence means leaders realize that as smart as they are, their view or approach might be wrong. And what they do about that either fuels ethical leadership or spawns disaster. A significant cause of leadership failure in 2018, as in the past, was […]

read on »

The Oklahoma Business Ethics Consortium was privileged to host Gael O’Brien as our guest speaker in January 2014. Her program was insightful and resonated with our participants. Her leading-edge concepts were innovative and practical, providing tools to better equip our business leaders in continuing their endeavors to promote ethical standards in the workplace. We appreciated the depth of knowledge she brought to the table and inspiration she provided. It was truly an enriching experience; we would definitely welcome her back.

Shannon Warren
Founder, OK Ethics